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Hi from Texas!!

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Hi from Texas!!

« posted: 3 years ago »
Hey!! My name is Kristen, Im in the Fort Worth area. Im very new to everything. I do have my first tank going, its a 30gal. Im about to start up a 55 gal. And got lucky with a 3rd smaller tank Id like to set up for seahorses.

I look forward to learning from everyone on here and appreciate any advise, tips, info ect. Even some good critisicm when needed.

See yall around
  • Offline Chuck
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Re: Hi from Texas!!

« Reply #1 posted: 3 years ago »
Hiya Kristen and Welcome!

Do you know what size that 3rd tank is?
Seahorses do require a certain amount of space (tank gallons) to remain comfortable and healthy.
I've seen where some folks say, that for the larger species like H. erectus, we'd need a tank of 29g or larger.
Some of us would be comfortable with something a bit bigger then a 29g.

Is that 3rd tank a "standard" shaped one?
Or cubed, tall, or long (which is called a "breeder") shaped tank?
Can you give us the dimensions of the tank...length, height, and depth?

Again welcome aboard!
There are a number of folks here that can help you out with your request to keep Seahorses.

Chuck
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Re: Hi from Texas!!

« Reply #2 posted: 3 years ago »
Unfortunately I havent measured it yet, I just got it this weekend. I guess its standard shaped. And Ive already started reading 😀 so this tank seems it would be good for a smaller species.
When I get home I will measure and post it on here.
  • Offline Chuck
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Re: Hi from Texas!!

« Reply #3 posted: 3 years ago »
Availability is an issue right now.
There aren't as many species for sale as there were 5 or 6 years ago.

Right now you could find Abo's (very large ones--up to 12 inches), Erectus, Comes, and Reidi (medium sized 6 to 8 inches high) or Dwarf (about 1 inch).
The information I was referring to, about the 29 gallon tank, was about keeping Erectus size Seahorses.

Each of the species I've mentioned need a certain amount of wate space to be comfortable.
Abo's should be kept in a tank no less then 50 gallons.
A pair of medium sized ones should be OK ina 29, but a 35 or 40 might be better.
Dwarf Seahorses would do better in a 5.5 gallon tank.

They large species and the medium ones would be able to be trained to eating frozen foods. Captive bred ones should be eating that already when they arrive. WC (wild caught) ones would need to be trained to take frozen.

DSH (Dwarf Seahorses) must have live food at least twice a day (3 times would be better).
This would mean hatching brine shrimp hatcheries (a couple) going continuously.

DSH are my particular favorites of all of the Seahorse species.
I've kept them several times in the past and am presently planning new tanks for more of them.

I hope I've given you some help.

Chuck
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Re: Hi from Texas!!

« Reply #4 posted: 3 years ago »
Yea this tank is alittle smaller than my 30 gallon. I was wanting to do the dwarf sea horses in this one. Theres definately not enough room, i wouldnt think, for the bigger ones.
Since it hasnt been started, do you think itd be a good idea to get a good copepod colony going in the tank before i put anything in there?
  • Offline Chuck
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Re: Hi from Texas!!

« Reply #5 posted: 3 years ago »
There are a couple of things you can do, as the tank's cycling comes to an end, like adding copepods and mysid shrimp. Then the CUC (clean-up crew) animals and any macro's.

Filtration, substrate, and lighting need to be addressed before you can begin the cycling.

Any tank over 10 gallons is going to be pretty challenging for any 1st time keeper of DSH.
It's not impossible. It will just require a bit more planning because of the size of the tank.
DSH will move about the tank but they won't travel large areas (12 inches or more) to hunt for food.
A tank of 10 gallons or larger will require much higher amounts of bbs (baby brine shrimp--the most common live food used for DSH) and this "over feeding" will need to be addressed with filtration and CUC/tankmate animals.

A couple of seperate hatching containers, for the bbs, will need to be set-up, operated, cleaned, and set back up on a rotating daily basis...1 harvested and cleaned while a 2nd ones is hatching new bbs.

The dimensions of the tank will let some of us here help you get it set up properly so you can have a greater chance of success.

DSH are my favorite of all the Seahorse species. As I mentioned I've had several tanks up and running at different times, with different equipment arrangements.
Just remember one thing. You will get several opinions on how best to set up and run your tank. Always take the advise that you feel most comfortable with.
What has worked for me, or oden, or Tami might not work for you. So take each suggestion and see if it fits into your life-style and the time you have available to maintain your tank.

Chuck
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  • Offline suew
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Re: Hi from Texas!!

« Reply #6 posted: 3 years ago »
Hi Kristen,

Welcome to fursedjaw.com :) If you need any help just ask thats what we are here for we all help each other.

When Chuck mention the Abdominalis (pot bellies ) you will need to have a tank 24-29 inch high as they are one of the larger sh,they are a lovely sh and a very friendly one.

We love looking at other peoples tanks so when you do get up and running do send us some pictures.

  Sue.
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Re: Hi from Texas!!

« Reply #7 posted: 3 years ago »
I still need to get the deminsions. I got home and the house was being worked on, so I totally forgot. But i will get it tonight.

And yes i will definately post a pic once its up, but i have awhile before its going. Im still have my dry rock to cure and cycle, and then get it going in the tanks.