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Hairy Ghost Pipefish

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  • Offline TamiW
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Hairy Ghost Pipefish

« posted: 2 years ago »
I was browsing syngnathid pictures (as I am wont to do) and I came across this SPECTACULAR picture of a hairy ghost pipefish.



Photographer Mark Rosenstein
From INaturalist.org
  • H. erectus, H. comes, H. kuda, H. zosterae, Doryrhamphus excisus, Bryx dunckeri, Corythoichthys flavofasciatus
It's all about the snick!
  • Offline TamiW
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Re: Hairy Ghost Pipefish

« Reply #1 posted: 2 years ago »
I just noticed all the shrimp near it (mysis? Something else?)
  • H. erectus, H. comes, H. kuda, H. zosterae, Doryrhamphus excisus, Bryx dunckeri, Corythoichthys flavofasciatus
It's all about the snick!
  • Offline Chuck
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Re: Hairy Ghost Pipefish

« Reply #2 posted: 2 years ago »
I remember many many years ago the first time I saw a picture of one of those AMAZING ghost pipefish.
My first thought was..."I gotta get me some".
I spent some time looking up stuff about their environment, their needs, anything about breeding habits.
Back then there wasn't much available. There's more now but not enough for my comfort zone.

I put them in the category of Sea Dragons.
Love them, hope some of the national aquariums have luck with them, and enjoy seeing any more pictures someone is willing to show {{cough-cough-Tami-cough-cough}},

Thanks for this one.
It's one I haven't seen on my trips around the web.

Chuck
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  • Offline TamiW
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Re: Hairy Ghost Pipefish

« Reply #3 posted: 2 years ago »
Hehehe I have a bunch of Creative Commons images of them I've been meaning to make into a gallery. I probably need to get a move on it.

I've thought the same thing. I would like to try to keep them some day, but not until I feel I've got adequate live food and enough pipefish experience under my belt, with an eye towards breeding. Even then, they are difficult to ship, so it may be a very long time before I seek them out.

This picture just can up on inaturalist. I have a Google alert set up to email me daily with any new web pages that contain something about seahorses, pipefish and sea dragons. Most of it is garbage, but every once in a while, I find a gem like this.
  • H. erectus, H. comes, H. kuda, H. zosterae, Doryrhamphus excisus, Bryx dunckeri, Corythoichthys flavofasciatus
It's all about the snick!
  • Offline Chuck
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Re: Hairy Ghost Pipefish

« Reply #4 posted: 2 years ago »
Anything you find worth sharing....   ;)

Did you ever come across any discussion/article about ghost pipefish being thought of as possible "pipehorses"?
Memory fragments of something I saw a very long time ago, I think it was in a book.
Ya know, those things made of paper with this black stuff called ink?   8)
I get the strangest looks from the boys when I explain having to do research in libraries, and with books.

Anyway, from what I remember it was something about their body structure.
The large "seahorse shaped" head, along with the head-body proportion.
And it was a long time back.

Chuck
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  • Offline TamiW
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Re: Hairy Ghost Pipefish

« Reply #5 posted: 2 years ago »
Lol about books and paper! I have to print out any complex articles or research papers on the topic or I just can't focus. I guess that makes me one of the "olds".

I haven't heard that suggestion before. They do fall into the syngnathiformes order, and recent genetic data has confirmed that this is where they belong - Some species previously considered to be closely related like sticklebacks have been kicked out. My understanding is that they're fairly distant from seahorses and "normal" pipefish.

There is also some disagreement in these findings, and there are a few different ways to look at the phylogenetic relationships; so the issue isn't set in stone by any means. I get the sense that some of the disagreement is from people who like the tradition taxonomy and don't like the upset that it theoretically creates. But I don't know enough about the specific science using genetic data to comment if the hesitation over accepting some of the new findings is warranted.

Assuming Solenostomus sp do continue to be places within the syngnathiformes order, then they are an interesting   fish because the female holds the eggs. The question then becomes, how and when did they switch from female care to male care. When we thought that sticklebacks were closer related, it was easy to see how male care became a part of it. Now, if our understanding is correct, parental care went from broadcast spawning, to females carrying the eggs and then flipped to males carrying the eggs. Or rather, that is how the modern relatives appear to  handle brood rearing.

One of the more interesting issues with using genetics to try and figure out taxonomy is that much of the genetic information does not square with the previous morphological taxonomy for the fish consider to be part of syngathiformes and gasterosteiforms. In short, it seems that all the physical similarities that we thought meant a close relationship between different fish is turning out to be wrong (so far).

You can read about it here: http://currents.plos.org/treeoflife/article/the-tree-of-life-and-a-new-classification-of-bony-fishes/
A quick look at the proposed syngnathiformes change from that paper:


If you msg me your email address, I can send you a paper on the topic too. It seems to argue against some of the findings of the above paper. But I don't know enough of the science to comment if it's legitimate objections or if it is one of those things where researchers are having a hard time letting go of old ideas, so they are cherry picking data they like.
  • H. erectus, H. comes, H. kuda, H. zosterae, Doryrhamphus excisus, Bryx dunckeri, Corythoichthys flavofasciatus
It's all about the snick!
  • Offline Chuck
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Re: Hairy Ghost Pipefish

« Reply #6 posted: 2 years ago »
Interesting read, so far and what my mind has absorded the first time through..
I'd be very interested in reading that pager.
It's been a while since I wrapped my brain around good science but I'll manage.

PM sent...

Chuck
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  • Offline Chuck
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Re: Hairy Ghost Pipefish

« Reply #7 posted: 2 years ago »
Thank you very much, Tami!
Really interesting read. Trying to absorb the info within....

Chuck
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  • Offline TamiW
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Re: Hairy Ghost Pipefish

« Reply #8 posted: 2 years ago »
Ha, I know right? I really need to find a class that covers genetics. There is so much information that has changed in just the past few years that at this point, I can't evaluate the specifics when it comes to hard science genetics.
  • H. erectus, H. comes, H. kuda, H. zosterae, Doryrhamphus excisus, Bryx dunckeri, Corythoichthys flavofasciatus
It's all about the snick!

Re: Hairy Ghost Pipefish

« Reply #9 posted: 1 month ago »
That's a beautiful Pipefish you have there!