NOWhereMonkey

A spectacular new species of seadragon (Syngnathidae)

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  • Offline DanU
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The Ruby Seadragon.  Enjoy the read!

Dan
  • H. erectus/reidi/barbouri/kuda/comes/zosterae/fisheri/ingens
  • Offline greytdog
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Dan,
Not sure if its me, but Im unable to download the pdf.
  • Offline DanU
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Don't know.  Looks like it has been downloaded several times.  No issue downloading here.

Here is a link to the original article:  http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/2/2/140458

Dan
  • H. erectus/reidi/barbouri/kuda/comes/zosterae/fisheri/ingens
  • Offline TamiW
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I am super stoked about this. It looks very similar to the weedy seadragon, but there appears to be some important differences; including larger musculature and skeleton structure to support presumably a larger pectoral fin.

Scripps has a good article about it.

We haven't find the complete fish yet, so no idea how the filaments look, but there is some guesses based on some raised areas. It is considered to be part of the Phyllopteryx genus; and has a very similar body shape. Which leads to another interesting idea - What if it has been spotted before, but being similar in appearance, was not recognized as a different species.

I'll also be interested to see how this is accepted by the scientific community. The genetics are different enough that if I understand it correctly, it really does support the idea it's a distinct species. I'm not knowledgable enough about genetics to understand the supporting data.

I can't wait until we hear more. I spent some time on flickr today looking at seadragon pictures to see if any might match the physical description of Phyllopteryx dewysea with no obvious luck. There does seem to be a lot of variance in morphology, so if there wasn't supporting DNA evidence, I'd be thinking this was just a natural variation and not a true species. But they're saying the difference between Phyllopteryx taeniolatus and this new fish support's the notion that it's a novel species.

The red coloration may be to make it basically invisible in deeper water. At least one of the articles on the topic suggested as much.
  • H. erectus, H. comes, H. kuda, H. zosterae, Doryrhamphus excisus, Bryx dunckeri, Corythoichthys flavofasciatus
It's all about the snick!
  • Offline Bruce
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I just saw this and it is totally fascinating but I would love to see a picture of a live specimen.

There is an Australian book The Sea-Horse and its Relatives by Whitley and Allen from 1958 that lists a third species of seadragon. Unfortunately I gave my copy away and no longer can look it up. I believe the 3rd dragon listed is a pipehorse but I can't remember the scientific name.

Thanks for posting this Dan and Tami.
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Bruce