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H. reidi fry

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  • Offline DanU
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H. reidi fry

« posted: 2 years ago »
It has been a while since I started a new batch of H. reidi fry.  Monday we had a batch and I had an empty fry system so away we go.  The tank is the typical 90 gal tub we use and can be seen on the my fry video.  The sump is a 30 gal breeder with a bio reactor, skimmer, 100 micron filter sock and a 5 mic cartridge filter on the return.  One pic of the fry and the other I was trying to get the copepods in the pic.  You can see the congregation at the standpipe but not of them scattered throughout the water column.

Dan
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  • Offline Laurasea
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Re: H. reidi fry

« Reply #1 posted: 2 years ago »
Wow, is that one birth? And thank you Dan, my reidi female is doing great. She is such a vibrant lovely yellow.
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  • Offline DanU
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Re: H. reidi fry

« Reply #2 posted: 2 years ago »
Yes one brood.  Reidi can have large broods.  This one wasn't so large, estimated 400 or so.  Our brood stock are mature, about 5 - 6 years old.  We sometimes see 800 or more fry in a brood. 

Dan
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  • Offline Bruce
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Re: H. reidi fry

« Reply #3 posted: 2 years ago »
Very nice. Does the smaller size, compared to erectus, make them more difficult to feed in the 90 tub? How old are they in this pic? Do you have similar success rates for growing them to adulthood as the erectus? Sorry about the ??? :-).
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Re: H. reidi fry

« Reply #4 posted: 2 years ago »
No, it actually makes it easier as I can load more food at one time and don't have to constantly add food to keep the density up.  At this particular stage (6 days old), I add somewhere in the neighborhood of 1/2 to 1 million pods (zoo plankton) twice a day.  Lights are on 24/7 during the pelagic phase.  There are also about 300 or so live mysids in the tank as well that are feeding on the same food.  This all will change when I go to artemia somewhere around day 10 to 14.  Artemia will lose much of its nutritional value, so in the evenings when we turn the lights out, we will turn up the flow and flush most of the artemia out.  We use 100 micron mesh filter socks to catch them and dispose of them.  The mysids will also feed on much of what remains during the evening hours.

Success with the pelagic species such as this are definitely not the same as with H. erectus.  We generally expect somewhere close to a 90% survival rate with erectus.  The pelagic species are all over the place.  We have had high survival rates and no survival.  We need to be somewhere near 50% to really make it profitable.  Otherwise it makes more sense for us to fill the tanks with H. erectus fry.

I suspect based on what we have experienced and talking with different researchers on the subject, the immune system is slow to fully develop.  It is easy to lose the whole batch at any time up to about 3 inches or so.  Even when converted to frozen, you are not out of the woods until they have matured or grown big enough.   

Dan
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  • Offline Bruce
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Re: H. reidi fry

« Reply #5 posted: 2 years ago »
Lights are on 24/7 during the pelagic phase.

I find this very interesting.It makes sense as they need to see the food and always have plenty to eat. Did you come up with this yourself or ?

I have only had reidi fry once and they were given to me when I was a newbie. Of course I had no food supply small enough for them but neither did the person who gave them to me.

Thanks for posting DanU. H. reidi are certainly harder to raise but they are beautiful horses.
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Re: H. reidi fry

« Reply #6 posted: 2 years ago »
I have seen the argument go both ways on lights on 24/7 or for day and night cycles.  We have done both.  They grow faster on the 24/7 method.  Somewhere around 10 to 14 days they will start hitching and then we go with day/night light cycles.

Dan
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  • Offline Laurasea
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Re: H. reidi fry

« Reply #7 posted: 2 years ago »
Beautiful reidi Bruce!!!!!!!
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Re: H. reidi fry

« Reply #8 posted: 2 years ago »
Another week.  Hitching started on Monday.  That is early based on our experience.  Not all were hitching, but the early ones were.  We are in process of converting over to enriched artemia.  Losses thus far have been minimal.  Still a long ways to go.  The next critical phase is the conversion to artemia without major losses.  We will see where it goes.

The pic is from this morning.  They are feeding on artemia.  They are lined up facing the current and more or less hovering while feeding.  This is usually a good sign.

Dan
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Re: H. reidi fry

« Reply #9 posted: 2 years ago »
When do they turn that love yellow?   I am in love with my reidi!! I have to get some picture posted soon!
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Re: H. reidi fry

« Reply #10 posted: 2 years ago »
Usually after they are moved to a glass tank.  Sometimes they will turn in the tubs, but mostly after they have been moved to a glass tank.  Then usually within two weeks, they are all yellow.

Dan
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Re: H. reidi fry

« Reply #11 posted: 2 years ago »
Thanks for the update Dan. Please continue if you have the time. It is nice to see what early success with read looks like. I hope you get your 50%+ survival.
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Re: H. reidi fry

« Reply #12 posted: 2 years ago »
We won't hit 50% with this batch!  Abbie and I had to go out of town on family business for almost a week.  That means we had 1 person to cover all the care which typically runs from around 7:00 am to 10:00 pm with 2 full time and 1 part time.  Overall the job was done well but doesn't leave much time to pay as close attention as is needed for this species.  On our return, they were going but I could see it going to start dropping off and it did.  They have been steadily dropping off.  I have another system prepped and ready to try again.  I usually only do 1 batch at time with this species at least until they gotten past the danger point.  We have a male due any day.

Dan
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Re: H. reidi fry

« Reply #13 posted: 2 years ago »
I am sorry to hear that you have had losses.  I really can't fathom the rigor and daily diligence it must require to raise seahorses as a buisness, especially the more at risk species of fry.  I don't know how you and Abby do not experience burn out.  My hat is off to both of you for your perseverance!
And best of luck with the next batch.
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