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56 column

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  • Offline Knap_123
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Re: 56 column

« Reply #45 posted: 1 year ago »
I have matrix in my sump. But I think I want to add one liter more. Getting some nuisense algae and diatoms.  But I have a little canister filter I could use. I spoke to a rep at seachem . And she said this would be the best way.
  • Offline Laurasea
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Re: 56 column

« Reply #46 posted: 1 year ago »
What  a lovely mandarins nice and plump!!!! Great job !!!!
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  • Offline Knap_123
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Re: 56 column

« Reply #47 posted: 1 year ago »
Thank you, I've had it awhile. Was real skinny when I got it. But loves frozen and micro pellets.
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Re: 56 column

« Reply #48 posted: 1 year ago »
The matrix is really only going to give you more capacity to process the ammonia produced in the tank. If you have NO ammonia and NO nitrates, then you shouldn't have need of more matrix.
Your nuisance algae will be fueled by things like phosphates and the nitrates produced by the matrix/live rock in your system. While you MAY get some more exchange lowering the nitrates, I don't think the matrix has enough anaerobic zone to be significant for this purpose, and, it is not going to help remove phosphates IMO.
Couple that with the need to clean mechanical filtration often and the fact that most canister filters are more involved to clean, you may end up getting lazy a few times and end up with increasing colonies of nasty bacteria.
If I find nuisance algae in my seahorse tanks after they have matured, it is a sign for me that I'm not keeping up with sufficient husbandry as in water changes and removal of uneaten food and detritus including that trapped in filters, rockwork, and decor.
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  • Offline TamiW
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Re: 56 column

« Reply #49 posted: 1 year ago »
That isn't entirely true. Yes, hair algae can come from nitrates and phosphates. However, one thing that frustrates aquarists to no end is the mistaken idea that phosphate or nitrates are always the cause of nuisance algae. In reality, many algae species directly take ammonia from the water column. In these cases, it never has a chance to break down into the later products. Randy Holmes-Farley talks about it here: http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2007-02/rhf/#13

This is frequently overlooked, leading to lots of hair pulling (no pun intended). And in online communities, the belief that the person is lying because their test result don't show any nitrate or phosphate. Or the old stand by "The [nitrate || phosphate ] is being consumed as fast as it is being produced." trope, which isn't exactly right.

I would look at the nitrate, phosphate, ph and alk. If nitrate and phosphates are elevated, then you need nutrient export - be it skimming, more water changes, something like bio-pellets. Or even harvesting the macro algae faster. If phosphates are high but nitrates low, than the macro algae may be nitrate limited, in which case you need to lower phosphates by the aforementioned means, or something like GFO, puragen, etc. If both come out to 0, then there is a pretty strong likelihood that it's actually direct ammonia use, and needs something to manage the ammonia, be it additional media or even shifting ammonia to the media by having an aggressive enough clean up crew to remove the nuisance algae.

As for the ph and alk, those two can be suggestive of various problems, if they're off at all, it might be an indicator of too much detritus in the tank, or needing more regular water changes, etc... They won't directly measure what might be the problem, but can help point to various causes.

I do agree with rayjay on canister filters. They just don't do a spectacular job in marine tanks, and can harbor bacteria that is especially harmful to seahorses. They tend to make things worse in seahorse tanks.

Finally, make sure the flow rate is where it needs to be. You want a minimum of 10x turn over in the tank, but possibly more like 15-20x to really move particles out of the water that break down into excess nutrients.
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  • Offline Knap_123
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Re: 56 column

« Reply #50 posted: 1 year ago »
I'll increase the water changes, and I have a little CPR reactor. Maybe I'll add it to help out some. Get some biopellets.
  • Offline DanU
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Re: 56 column

« Reply #51 posted: 1 year ago »
One of the easy and can be done cheaply fixes for nuisance algae is to deploy a vertical algae scrubber.  A scrubber, skimmer and proper water changes can make for a very simple but effective way to eliminate it without all the other do dads everyone seems to want to add.

Dan
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  • Offline TamiW
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Re: 56 column

« Reply #52 posted: 1 year ago »
Yes! Algae scrubbers are great. That is an excellent suggestion.
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Re: 56 column

« Reply #53 posted: 1 year ago »
I'll look at building 1 this weekend.
  • Offline DanU
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Re: 56 column

« Reply #54 posted: 1 year ago »
Keep in mind they don't have to be fancy.  Some make them more complicated than need be.  The Smithsonian Marine Institute who originally designed a horizontal algae scrubber back in the 60's (Still in use BTW) has a vertical scrubber on their seahorse display tank.  It consists of water running over a screen material into a pail with a clip on shop light with a single bulb.  Not fancy or expensive, but effective.

Dan
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